Flickr, biggest image database in the world. They define their own API http://www.flickr.com/services/api

GitHub, largest code repository database: http://developer.github.com/v3/

Twitter: https://dev.twitter.com/docs

ebay: https://www.x.com/developers/ebay

and so on...

All these APIs are built specifically for each system. Why is that? Why aren't they using RDF or another triple system, to allow distributed searches using SPARQL? It seems like they would only benefit from these technologies.

The reason I ask is because I find myself with a large database of information, and I want to allow people to use this data and search through it. So I am doing research and trying to figure out which system would best allow me to do this. Any help?

asked 09 Jan '13, 09:27

Luca%20Matteis's gravatar image

Luca Matteis
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accept rate: 13%

edited 09 Jan '13, 09:37


This is really an economics question. It may not be useful to the goals of a group/company/organisation to make it's data shareable; they want people to visit their site, not quietly have reuse of their data. They will invest resources in enhancing the site and apps around it but not for some ideal of "sharing". Sharing may be of secondary value or even seen as unhelpful to the goals.

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answered 09 Jan '13, 13:49

AndyS's gravatar image

AndyS ♦
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accept rate: 33%

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question asked: 09 Jan '13, 09:27

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last updated: 09 Jan '13, 13:49