<owl:Class rdf:ID="Period">
    <rdfs:subClassOf>
      <owl:Restriction>
        <owl:onProperty>
          <owl:ObjectProperty rdf:ID="element"/>
        </owl:onProperty>
        <owl:allValuesFrom>
          <owl:Class rdf:ID="Element"/>
        </owl:allValuesFrom>
      </owl:Restriction>
    </rdfs:subClassOf>
    <rdfs:subClassOf>
      <owl:Restriction>
        <owl:allValuesFrom rdf:resource="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#integer"/>
        <owl:onProperty>
          <owl:DatatypeProperty rdf:ID="number"/>
        </owl:onProperty>
      </owl:Restriction>
    </rdfs:subClassOf>
  </owl:Class>

In the above snippet,why is rdfs:subClassOf used ?

asked 14 Apr '11, 12:46

semanticwhacko's gravatar image

semanticwhacko
30916
accept rate: 0%


I often wonder that and have to remind myself... Basic class typology (hierarchy) is expressed by RDF Schema (RDFS), OWL builds on that to provide richer Description Logics. What makes it difficult to remember is that RDFS does subClassOf and OWL does other things like equivalentClass which seem similar at least in syntactic naming, so it seems subClassOf should be an OWL thing not and RDFS thing. But then I pull up a snippet and remind myself. :-)

See RDF Primer - Describing Classes http://www.w3.org/TR/rdf-primer/#schemaclasses

link

answered 14 Apr '11, 12:59

harschware's gravatar image

harschware ♦
7.7k1616
accept rate: 20%

i meant which class subclass refering to.Is it Period is a subclass of Element

(14 Apr '11, 13:05) semanticwhacko semanticwhacko's gravatar image

The class Period is a subclass of the set of all class. It defines exactly this subset where all values (objects) of the property element have the type Element (at least), plus all values (in this case literals) of the property number have the (data-)type xsd:integer.

link

answered 14 Apr '11, 13:22

zazi's gravatar image

zazi
3.4k1213
accept rate: 13%

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Asked: 14 Apr '11, 12:46

Seen: 1,132 times

Last updated: 14 Apr '11, 13:22